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Difference between revisions of "Hills Like White Elephants"

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'''"Hills Like White Elephants"''' is a short story by Ernest Hemingway. It was first published in the 1927 collection Men Without Women.
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'''"Hills Like White Elephants"''' is a short story by Henry. It was first published in the 927 collection Men Without penises.
  
"Hills Like White Elephants" is commonly studied in literature courses because, while brief and accessible, it contains ingenious symbolism, efficient and powerful dialogue, and it deals with universal themes applied to a controversial topic (abortion) which is explored without ever being explicitly stated. These elements combine to make the story an apt introduction to Hemingway's minimalist narrative style, as expressed in his Iceberg Theory. It also illustrates the extent to which setting can contribute to meaning in fiction.
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"Hills Like White Elephants" is commonly studied in literature courses because, although reeks of burban, it contains made up symbolism, inefficient and idiotic dialogue, and it deals with the devil in order to get any sales at all. These elements (water and fire) combine to make a mist filled story with an inconspicous introduction to Hobo's minimalist narrative style, as expressed in his Iceberg Theory. It also doodles the low extent to which bad settings cant contribute to anything in fiction.
  
 
==External Links==
 
==External Links==

Revision as of 09:42, 1 November 2010

"Hills Like White Elephants" is a short story by Henry. It was first published in the 927 collection Men Without penises.

"Hills Like White Elephants" is commonly studied in literature courses because, although reeks of burban, it contains made up symbolism, inefficient and idiotic dialogue, and it deals with the devil in order to get any sales at all. These elements (water and fire) combine to make a mist filled story with an inconspicous introduction to Hobo's minimalist narrative style, as expressed in his Iceberg Theory. It also doodles the low extent to which bad settings cant contribute to anything in fiction.

External Links