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Difference between revisions of "Getting to Yes"

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(Focus on interests, not positions)
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| image        = [[Image:0140157352.jpg]]
 
| author      = Roger Fisher, William Ury (and William Paton in the 2nd Edition)
 
| author      = Roger Fisher, William Ury (and William Paton in the 2nd Edition)
 
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=====Focus on interests, not positions=====
 
=====Focus on interests, not positions=====
In this step there is exploration of the true interests underlying the positions of each side, rather than a focus on the superficial positions with which parties come to the table. The initial positions presented may obscure what the parties really want.
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In this step there is exploration of the true interests underlying the positions of each side, rather than a focus on the superficial positions with which parties come to the table. The initial positions presented may obscure what the parties really want. It is therefore essential to:
 
*Ask questions to explore interests
 
*Ask questions to explore interests
 
*Talk about your own interests
 
*Talk about your own interests
  
 
=====Generate options for mutual gain=====
 
=====Generate options for mutual gain=====
In this step time is for parties to set aside time together to generate alternative candidate solutions. The idea is that parties contribute together creatively to generate possibilities for '''mutual gain''' i.e. a '''Win-Win''' agreement.
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In this step time is for parties to set aside time together to generate alternative candidate solutions. The idea is that parties contribute together creatively to generate possibilities for '''mutual gain''' i.e. a '''Win-Win''' agreement. This step involves:
 
*Brainstorming
 
*Brainstorming
 
*Broadening options
 
*Broadening options
 
*Looking for mutual gain
 
*Looking for mutual gain
*Make their decision easy
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*Making their decision easy
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=====Insist on using objective criteria=====
 
=====Insist on using objective criteria=====
The final step is to use mutually agreed and objective criteria for evaluating the candidate solutions. During this stage they encourage openness and surrender to principle not pressure.
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The final step is to use mutually agreed and objective criteria for evaluating the candidate solutions. During this stage they encourage openness and surrender to principle not pressure. This step involves:
 
*Fair standards
 
*Fair standards
 
*Fair procedures
 
*Fair procedures
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#Make the most of your assets: they recommend that the better your BATNA the greater your power
 
#Make the most of your assets: they recommend that the better your BATNA the greater your power
 
=====What if they won't play?=====
 
=====What if they won't play?=====
They suggest 3 approaches (to encourage and coach them to use Principled Negotiation too):
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They suggest 3 approaches (to encourage and coach the other party to use Principled Negotiation too):
 
#You should use principled negotiation to encourage them to do the same
 
#You should use principled negotiation to encourage them to do the same
 
#If they continue to attack using positional bargaining, refuse to retaliate and redirect their attacks on the problem. They term this '''Negotional Jujitsu''' after the oriental martial art in which the attackers blows are deflected.
 
#If they continue to attack using positional bargaining, refuse to retaliate and redirect their attacks on the problem. They term this '''Negotional Jujitsu''' after the oriental martial art in which the attackers blows are deflected.
 
#Involve a third party to fuse the views of the opposing parties, which they term a '''One Text Procedure'''.
 
#Involve a third party to fuse the views of the opposing parties, which they term a '''One Text Procedure'''.
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=====What if they use dirty tricks?=====
 
=====What if they use dirty tricks?=====
 
They give examples of dirty tricks that can be used in negotiation, such as lies, psychological abuse and pressure tactics. They describe the 2 common responses seen, either of appeasement or reciprocal dirty tricks.
 
They give examples of dirty tricks that can be used in negotiation, such as lies, psychological abuse and pressure tactics. They describe the 2 common responses seen, either of appeasement or reciprocal dirty tricks.
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====V Ten Questions====
 
====V Ten Questions====
 
This section of the second edition considers 10 questions submitted to the authors by readers of the first edition, and the authors responses to these.
 
This section of the second edition considers 10 questions submitted to the authors by readers of the first edition, and the authors responses to these.
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====External links====
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[http://books.google.com/books?id=sjH3emOkC1MC Google Books]
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[[Category:Summaries|Getting to Yes]]
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[[Category:Self Help]]
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[[Category:Business, Investing, Finance]]
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[[Category:Bestsellers]]
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[[Category:Non-fiction]]
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[[Category:Published in 1981]]

Latest revision as of 15:57, 14 February 2016